BUILDING

SHARE WITH US THE ADVENTURE OF CONVERTING THE FORMER ZENGER TRANSFORMER SUBSTATION INTO THE NEW KUNSTHALLE PRAHA SPACE FOR ART AND CULTURE.

HISTORY


The front facade of the Zenger transformer station was to be decorated by four light-kinetic sculptures by avant-garde artist Zdeněk Pešánek. The series of four light-kinetic objects called “one hundred years of electricity” won major awards at the International Exhibition in Paris in 1937, but was destroyed during World War II. Only the models of these sculptures have survived and are now held by Prague’s National Gallery at the Trade Fair Palace.
The front facade of the Zenger transformer station was to be decorated by four light-kinetic sculptures by avant-garde artist Zdeněk Pešánek. The series of four light-kinetic objects called “one hundred years of electricity” won major awards at the International Exhibition in Paris in 1937, but was destroyed during World War II. Only the models of these sculptures have survived and are now held by Prague’s National Gallery at the Trade Fair Palace.

The transformer substation building in Prague-Klárov was built between 1930 and 1931 by the Electricity Company of the City of Prague. The facility commenced operations in 1932, reducing the voltage from 220V to 110V and converting the current from alternating to direct as required by the tram and trolleybus lines in Prague 6, 7 and part of Prague 1.

The station, built on the site of some demolished barracks in Klárov, was designed by architect Vilém Kvasnička in conservative neo-classicist style so as to harmonise with other buildings in the Lesser Town. However, the technical design of the building and its facilities was on a very advanced level for the period and implemented state-of-the-art technologies. The station was named after the famous physicist and meteorologist Václav Karel Bedřich Zenger, a professor at Czech Technical University in Prague.

Over time, the technology evolved and was miniaturized. In the late 1970’s, after forty years of operation, the required equipment space was reduced through the up-grading of some technologies. From 2000 to 2010 the whole converter station was modernized and the transformer system itself was moved to a small section in the basement. Most of the spacious building remained empty, posing the question of its future utilisation. Various options for the new functioning of the building were proposed, including its re-construction as a hotel.

In 2015, however, the Zenger converter station building was purchased by The Pudil Family Foundation, with the intention of creating a space for modern and contemporary art. It was later re-named Kunsthalle Praha.


RECONSTRUCTION

Our goal is to grant the building of the former Zenger converter substation a new lease of life. We plan to transform this cultural monument into a venue for art, culture and leisure. In the same way that the building once concealed the most modern technology behind its neoclassical facade, we now want it to house premium art exhibitions and provide a place for people to meet, relax and contemplate.

The architectural concept of Kunsthalle Praha was inspired by a number of examples of the conversion of industrial monuments abroad which resulted in exceptional spaces for cultural institutions.

We chose the Czech Architectural Studio Schindler Seko to design the conversion of the building. Their reconstruction proposal emanates from an effort to preserve the valuable architectural elements of the building as much as possible while at the same time creating a gallery space that ensures visitor comfort and meets the highest contemporary standards for exhibiting art.

Bringing in a wealth of experience in the fields of interior and exhibition design and scenography, professor Axel Kufus at the Universität der Künste Berlin and his colleagues from Berlin's Werkstudio, contributed to the design of the Kunsthalle Praha interior. Among their outstanding credentials is the interior design of the new Kunsthalle Mannheim.




Total
area

5 700 m²

Net
exhibition space

1 500 m²

Art deposits
and art handling space

1 710 m²


Entrance hall
with art shop

340 m²



Kunsthalle Praha
restaurant

210 m²

Art café
with Prague Castle view

180 m²